Telematics Data: Automakers Reach a Consensus on Right-to-Repair Agreement

In a revolutionary development, independent repair shops will now have uninterrupted access to cutting-edge diagnostic and repair information provided by automakers. This access, which also extends to telematics data necessary for vehicle diagnosis and repair, encompasses all vehicle technologies and powertrains, including battery-electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles.

Furthermore, both parties have pledged to collaborate on education and training initiatives. Independent repair shops will benefit from additional resources available through automakers’ repair websites and third-party information providers, software, and tools.

In a united front, the groups have also committed to supporting federal legislation that reinforces this commitment and ensures consumer freedom in vehicle repair nationwide. They are resolute in their opposition to any federal or state legislation that contradicts this commitment.

“Automakers fully support the right to repair, and the independent auto repair market is thriving with healthy competition,” stated John Bozzella, CEO of the alliance, emphasizing inclusivity. “Auto repairers across the U.S. have equal access to repair and diagnostic information, as provided to auto dealers. This sentiment is echoed not just by automakers, but also by the Federal Trade Commission. With today’s agreement, thousands of independent auto repairers and small businesses across all 50 states have once again reaffirmed their commitment to prioritizing customers’ needs.”

This agreement is particularly significant as Congress contemplates right-to-repair legislation, which has implications for the auto industry. One such legislation is the Right to Equitable and Professional Auto Industry Repair and Save Money on Auto Repair Transportation acts.

The REPAIR Act, reintroduced by Rep. Neal Dunn of Florida in February, seeks to ensure that vehicle owners and independent repair shops have equal access to repair and maintenance tools and data, just like automakers and their franchised dealerships.

In addition, the SMART Act, reintroduced by Rep. Darrell Issa of California in March, proposes an amendment to U.S. patent law that reduces the timeframe in which automakers can enforce design patents on collision repair parts against aftermarket parts suppliers from 14 years to two and a half years.

Explaining the commitment in a letter addressed to Senate and House Committee leaders, the three trade groups emphasized the durability of the updated agreement, which anticipates forthcoming advancements in automotive technologies.

“Rest assured, independent repairers and automakers share a mutual understanding on automotive data access. Both parties are firmly committed to ensuring that consumers have abundant repair options and can have their vehicles serviced in well-equipped shops by highly skilled technicians, regardless of time, location, or circumstance,” the letter stated.

 

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