Reports Indicate Scientists Achieve Lab-grown Chicken Meat That Resembles Authentic Taste

The lab-grown meat is created with cellular structures.

Challenging the Conventional: Lab-Grown Meat Making Waves in the Culinary World

Researchers around the globe have embarked on the innovative endeavor of cultivating meat in a laboratory environment, boasting a taste comparable to chicken. Lab-grown meat is meticulously crafted using cellular structures that closely resemble those found in chicken. This revolutionary approach eliminates the need for traditional animal farming and slaughter. Instead, it is fabricated within state-of-the-art bioreactors located in an urban factory in California, United States. This groundbreaking scientific pursuit began over a decade ago and garnered attention with the introduction of the world’s first lab-grown beef burger, which reportedly had a staggering price tag of £257,626 in 2013.

Since the consumption of the lab-grown burger by Mark Post, a distinguished biomedical engineer from Maastricht University, over 150 companies have delved into the development of cultured meat, milk, and other unique products like lab-grown leather. Recent reports from Nature.com reveal that two companies have obtained regulatory approval to market lab-grown “chicken” products, which may soon grace the menus of restaurants within the next year.

According to an industry report, the construction of production facilities is currently underway, with investments in lab-grown products soaring to an astonishing $2.78 billion. Proponents of this novel research are optimistic that successful integration of these products could help mitigate the adverse effects of traditional animal consumption. Conventional livestock rearing exerts substantial pressure on land resources and contributes to approximately 15% of greenhouse gas emissions, thereby raising significant environmental concerns.

Experts assert that the consumption of red and processed meat is associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. Additionally, traditional farms are linked to the spread of avian influenza and antibiotic resistance, posing further concerns. In an enlightening interview with The Guardian, Mark Post highlighted his interactions with long-term vegans who continue to experience cravings for meat even after 15 years. He suggests that if the habit of meat consumption proves difficult to relinquish, the logical solution would be to substitute traditional meat with lab-grown alternatives. Nonetheless, critics of the project contend that the efforts and costs invested in lab-grown meat outweigh its potential benefits.

Pelle Sinke, an esteemed industrial ecologist at the non-profit consultancy CE Delft in the Netherlands, also shared his insights on the matter with the news portal. Sinke emphasized the evident advantages of lab-grown meat in terms of land utilization and its positive impact on biodiversity. He believes it to be a more efficient method of meat production. However, he acknowledges that significant questions regarding energy consumption, technological advancements, and the market viability of cultured meat still remain.

 

Reference

Denial of responsibility! SamacharCentrl is an automatic aggregator of Global media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, and all materials to their authors. For any complaint, please reach us at – [email protected]. We will take necessary action within 24 hours.
Denial of responsibility! Samachar Central is an automatic aggregator of Global media. In each content, the hyperlink to the primary source is specified. All trademarks belong to their rightful owners, and all materials to their authors. For any complaint, please reach us at – [email protected]. We will take necessary action within 24 hours.
DMCA compliant image

Leave a Comment